Using Corn Damaged By Dry Weather For Silage

Dry weather during corn silking and pollination can significantly reduce grain yield expectations. Inadequate moisture can result in poor ear fill or even corn plants without any ear or grain. In extended dry weather situations, farmers can also face the immediate problem of providing adequate forage inventories to feed their livestock. Damaged corn crops with […]

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Baleage Tips

Making wrapped large bale haylage, also known as “baleage”, reduces the risk of rain damage within shorter harvest windows. Baleage can provide excellent quality forage. Existing baling and feeding equipment can be used, and it comes with its own storage. However, the risk of spoilage can sometimes be frustrating, particularly when forage supplies are limited and hay […]

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Summer Seeding Alfalfa

Summer seeding alfalfa and alfalfa-grass mixtures can be a good way to establish new fields so that full season yields can be harvested the following year. It is typically done after winter wheat or spring cereals are harvested, and also during years when alfalfa winterkill necessitates the quick establishment of new stands. Summer seeding of alfalfa forage mixtures can be […]

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Let’s Make Hay

Farmers are full of optimism. Corn and soybean prices hit unprecedented highs in 2011. Although there has been some volatility in the markets, many farmers are responding to high anticipated prices by again increasing their intended acres of corn and soybeans. It’s no secret that there was a loss of forage acreage last year, but […]

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Using “Scissors Cutting” To Optimize Forage Quality

High quality forage is essential to dairy profitability. The benchmark for “high producing dairy cow” quality alfalfa haylage has been considered to be 20% Crude Protein (CP), 30% Acid Detergent Fiber (ADF), and 40% Neutral Detergent Fiber (NDF). Many nutritionists consider NDF to be the primary quality variable to target when harvesting dairy alfalfa haylage. Determining Optimum […]

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